Hugh Coe

Hugh Coe is a Professor of Atmospheric Composition.

Having a graduating student tell you that they feel they have truly developed intellectually and achieved more than they believed they could achieve is, for me, a measure of success.

From the Bornean jungle to the Chilean coast

Small particles are suspended in the air; these come form natural sources such as sea spray and desert dust and also from man-made sources such as forest fires and motor vehicles.

My group’s research is focussed on developing and using novel instruments to measure the key properties of pollution particles to inform our understanding of their lifecycle.  

We use the large UK Research Aircraft as a flying laboratory, allowing us to make measurements in remote locations.  We have travelled to some of the most  important locations on the planet that are characteristic of particular particle types to understand and constrain their behaviour, making measurements in Bornean jungles, in clouds off the Chilean coast, and in the Savanna of West Africa. 

These measurements are used in air quality and climate models to test and refine predictions and improve forecasts of aerosol effects.

A strong school

Our School integrates a wide range of geological, environmental and atmospheric sciences, we are truly multi-disciplinary.  The environment here stimulates cross disciplinary activity in both research and teaching.  Our strong research right across informs and enlivens our teaching, making the learning environment stimulating and relevant. 

Our students integrate well into life here and work closely with academic staff. They are closely supported by our administrative team, voting one of our academic staff Faculty Teacher of the Year and one of our admin team Support staff member of the year.

My measure of success

Having a graduating student tell you that they feel they have truly developed intellectually and achieved more than they believed they could achieve is, for me, a measure of success. I hope students remember me as someone that cared about them and their learning during their time at Manchester.

What motivates me

I have been lucky enough to train and mentor many fantastic research students, help them to develop their own independent research ideas, and allow them to develop their own network of collaborators.  This continues to be a great pleasure and source of motivation for me.

I take great satisfaction from helping to shape an environment where students can maximise their potential and staff can fulfil their research goals and stimulate students with this knowledge.

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