Staff and students

Dr Eivind Bastesen

Dr Eivind Bastesen

(email: eivind.bastesen@uni.no)

Eivind is a senior researcher in structural/petroleum geology at the Centre for integrated Petroleum Research (University of Bergen, Norway) where he has worked since 2009. His research activities and projects includes, structural and diagenetic studies in carbonate rocks (Sinai, Greece, Oman arctic Norway), experimental (EOR) and analogue studies in deformed sandstones (Utah, Sinai), fault fracture studies in basement rocks (Norway onshore and offshore) and the potential role of fault and fractures in the exploitation of deep geothermal energy. Currently, Eivind holds several courses for undergraduates and supervises MSc students, whose projects focus on fault growth and diagenesis of fault zones in carbonates and deep geothermal energy research.

Professor Peter Burgess

Professor Peter Burgess

(email: peter.burgess@rhul.ac.uk)

Peter is a geologist with 10 years experience in hydrocarbon exploration and regional evaluation, and 11 years experience in academia.  He has diverse skills in petroleum system evaluation (including play based analysis, lead mapping and volumetric calculation), sedimentology, sequence and seismic stratigraphy, basin analysis, and numerical forward modelling. He is an experienced teacher and mentor at BSc, MSc, PhD and industry professional level. Research interests in sequence and seismic stratigraphy, carbonate deposystems and cyclicity, siliciclastic delta clinoforms, sediment routing and sediment supply, and the origins of unconformities, especially in cratonic interiors and on passive margins. Specialties include sequence and seismic stratigraphy and sedimentology of carbonate systems, basin analysis, with a focus on the geodynamics of basin formation, petroleum system evaluation and numerical forward modelling, especially stratigraphic forward modelling.

Dr Cathy Hollis

Dr Cathy Hollis

(email: cathy.hollis@manchester.ac.uk)

Cathy is Reader in Petrophysics & Petroleum Geology at University of Manchester, which she joined in 2007. She co-ordinates carbonate research within the Basin Studies Group in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences. Cathy is currently lead supervising 6 PhD students whose research projects focus on reconstruction of patterns of burial diagenesis within the Lower Carboniferous, UK and Cretaceous-Eocene of North Africa and the Arabian Plate.
Particular emphasis is on the integration of multi-scale, digital imaging technologies and modelling techniques with traditional field, petrographical and geochemical techniques to determine the origin, composition and migration pathways of fluids in the burial realm, and particularly within syn- and post-rift settings. Cathy has over 15 years' industrial experience, having worked as a consultant carbonate sedimentologist for Badley Ashton and Associates and as a production geologist and Carbonate Research Team Leader for Shell International E&P.

Dr Hilary Corlett

Dr Hilary Corlett

Hilary is currently working as a carbonate sedimentologist­­­ and stratigrapher at the Alberta Geological Survey (AGS) in Canada. Hilary has a diverse background with a focus in carbonate sedimentology and diagenesis in various settings including rift basins, passive margins, foreland basins and modern environments. Currently, she is part of a regional mapping and modelling team at the AGS who are working on the development of a 3D model of the entire province, a total area of 661,848 km² with over 5000 m of subsurface stratigraphy in the downdip portion of the basin. This mapping is undertaken at a variety of scales including chemostratigraphy of the shales at 0.5 m intervals to outline the relationship between coincident deposition of large carbonate complexes and basinal shales. Her previous work includes her post-doctoral project at the University of Manchester where she worked with other members of the PD3 team to evaluate fluid flow and subsequent dolomitisation along rifted margins on the Gulf of Suez. Part of many interdisciplinary teams at the AGS, University of Alberta, and the PD3 team, her current research interests include: dolomitisation, chemostratigraphy using provenance and redox paleoproxies, Paleozoic carbonate depositional systems, 3D geological and fluid flow modelling. 

Professor Robert Gawthorpe

Professor Robert Gawthorpe

(email: rob.gawthorpe@geo.uib.no)


Rob is Professor of Petroleum Geology at University of Bergen, since 2010, prior to which he was Professor of Sedimentology and Tectonics at University of Manchester. His research focuses on the sedimentology, stratigraphy and tectonics of sedimentary basins and understanding the processes that control the dynamics of the landscape-sedimentary system. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles in either specialist international geoscience journals or refereed special publications. Rob’s research is supported by the petroleum industry and research councils. His main research interests are in the sedimentology and tectonics of rift basins, especially the role of fault growth and linkage as a control on facies location, geometry and sequence variability. This work also considers coupling of stratigraphic and structural analysis to provide new information about the growth and interaction of fault segments associated with strain localization onto major, crustal-scale normal faults. Rob’s research also focuses on 3D seismic data interpretation and coupled 3D numerical modelling of sediment transport to investigate the relationship between structural and sedimentary processes and the link between climate change, sediment supply, tectonics and stratigraphic product. Rob was the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Distinguished Lecturer in 2005. In 1993 he was awarded the Lyell Fund by the Geological Society of London for 'leading expertise in the dynamics of sedimentary systems'.

Professor Atle Rotevatn

Professor Atle Rotevatn

(email: atle.rotevatn@geo.uib.no)

Atle has a mixed industry and academic background and is currently professor of structural reservoir geology at the University of Bergen. Atle’s research focuses on structural heterogeneity and fluid flow in carbonate and siliciclastic reservoirs, using outcrop studies in combination with a variety of approaches to fluid flow simulation. He has a broad appetite for anything structural, and is thus also interested in fault- and basin evolution, margin evolution and large scale geodynamics. He is involved in a range of collaborative research projects, involving a combination of industry and public funding. Atle presently supervises 8 PhD students and 9 MSc students. In 2013 Atle was, as the first recipient in 10 years, awarded the Reusch Medal from the Norwegian Geological Society for outstanding research contribution for scientists under the age of 36. Atle is an associate editor for the AAPG Bulletin, and serves as deputy head of petroleum geoscience at the University of Bergen.

Dr Stefan Schroeder

Dr Stefan Schroeder

(email: stefan.schroeder@manchester.ac.uk)

Stefan joined the University of Manchester as Lecturer in September 2011. His background is in carbonate sedimentology and diagenesis, with a focus on integration of data from outcrop, subsurface, and laboratory studies. He is particularly interested in the use of outcrop analogs and modern depositional systems to characterize carbonate reservoir heterogeneities. He has earned a PhD in geology from the University of Bern (Switzerland) in 2000, working on characterization of dolomite reservoirs in Oman. This was followed by postdoctoral research projects on Precambrian carbonates at MIT (USA) and the University of Johannesburg (South Africa). From 2007 to 2011, Stefan worked as a carbonate and subsurface geologist for Total SA, where he was involved in reservoir studies, regional exploration studies and research applied to reservoir characterization. He has worked on depositional systems from southern Africa to Mauritania, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and eastern Asia. Stefan’s current research interests are: Controls on carbonate deposition and reservoir development in active rift and compressive basins and in evaporite basins; Formation of microbial carbonates and their reservoir potential; Precambrian depositional systems as records of the early evolution of life and environments.

Dr Fiona Whitaker

Dr Fiona Whitaker

(email: fiona.whitaker@bristol.ac.uk)

Fiona is a Reader in Earth Sciences at the University of Bristol where she leads a research group of 3 postdoctoral researchers, 6 PhD students and 4 Masters students. Her research over the last 25 years has focussed on fundamental controls on flow and geochemical reactions in porous and permeable rocks, linking processes and products.
The objective is to understand physical and biogeochemical processes to solve both fundamental and applied problems in groundwater systems and oil and gas reservoirs, and specifically to better predict the nature and distribution of the products of those processes, including dissolutional porosity, dolomite bodies, carbonate and evaporite cements, ore bodies and hydrothermal weakening of volcanic edifices. behaviours, from fluid flow, solute transport and reactions, to interpretation of geophysical signals. Fiona’s work uses field studies of hydrogeological and biogeochemistry systems to constrain and evaluate coupled numerical simulations, to better understand the evolution of key rock properties. This novel approach has provided new insights into subsurface system behaviours, from fluid flow, solute transport and reactions, to interpretation of geophysical signals.

Post-doctoral researcher

Dr Irene Korneva

PhD Students

Joseph Gubbi
Lucy Manifold
Hamish Robertson

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